March 18, 2021

#18: Jaimon Mcmillian - Associate Inside Sales Representative at Dell Technologies


My guest for this episode is Jaimon Mcmillian. Jaimon is an incoming Associate Inside Sales Representative at Dell Technologies and a fellow MLTer. He shares his interest in the tech industry and how he got in from a non-technical standpoint, and we talk about the idea of betting on yourself and how it can potentially change your life for the better.

Show Notes

Introduction [0:00]

What Influenced Him to Pursue Business [01:12] 

Why He Chose His Major Over Finance or Economics [02:06] 

How He Learned Visual Studio [05:29] 

How He Went About Finding Communities On or Off His Campus [06:19] 

His Different Roles while Interning at JPMorgan Chase & Co. [10:29] 

Why He Decided Not to Pursue Either of These Roles for a Full Time Job [19:02] 

How He Remains Steadfast in His Decision and Sticks to His Guns [26:03] 

How the Transition to His Incoming Role as An Associate Inside Sales Rep at Dell Happen [30:38] 

Technical Classes He Found Helpful in His Industry [35:15] 

Tips on How to Better and Productively Work from Home Especially as a Student [36:38] 

How He Has Maintained A Balance and Level of Zen while Working from Home [39:05] 

Key Takeaways

  • I come from a family of educators, techies and tinkerers. The men and women in my family have fallen into those categories and they really push education…
  • “I think in high school, I would say that I had an interest and a knack for working with people and getting stuff done…”
  • “I wanted to go to school for something that's tech related, but that is also tactful in helping get things done...”
  • “I was very intentional with trying to get into a technical program, but something that wasn't super technical…”
  • “I went with Information Systems, because I liked how it brought together people, tech and business to get things done…”
  • Computer science seemed a bit more sciency, theory based, whereas Information Systems was about how can you take all this cool tech, like Visual Studio and gets stuff done.
  • “A lot of our classes are about taking those different technical pieces, and applying them to business concepts…”
  • “Starting out freshman year, we take an HTML and CSS class, we do Visual Studio, everybody's a little bit different because we have some electives that we have to take…”
  • “When it comes to growing your career in your network in tech, I believe that community plays a very important role, especially if you're a Black student, you know, there's not always support laid out for you.” – Kimmiko James
  • “Through those [LinkedIn] connections, I was able to be informed about these other smaller communities within tech or even communities that could open up doors down the road to help me get into tech…”
  • What's really cool is in my business school, we have to take these professional development courses, everybody has to take it. When I was taking it in the freshman year class, it was about resume writing, networking, interviewing.
  • “I learned very quickly that financial banking is a world on its own…”
  • As a summer analyst in the Middle Market space, I sat in the Charlotte office. We supported the three teams; credit, banking, and treasury, that helped the Middle Market Bank carry out the goal of serving their clients.
  • It was really great because I got to dive into this whole new world I never really got to see before. I also got a good vide breadth of different types of businesses, because I sat on the core team, which dealt with companies in the beverage, tech industry and the agricultural industry.
  • In the second summer, I was a part of the syndicated finance team. It was different from this last team because this team was a product group. We didn't just serve one specific part of the country; we serviced the entire country. It was definitely a good look and a great experience.
  • The job description [for a position at a bank] itself includes pretty convoluted words and concepts that I think dilute the excitement, the experience which that role can provide.
  • “While I'm in the business school, we touched finance and accounting a little bit, but that's not necessarily my personal interest…”
  • “I think what interested me in finance was the fact that there was so much that I did not know…”
  • “I kind of knew when it came time for full time that I wanted to pursue my career in tech, for sure. Even if I got the offer or not, I wanted to at least try to pursue it...”
  • “I was deciding to take a bet on myself, and to pursue something that I, not only thought I'd be good at, but something that I thought I'd be really, really interested in…”
  • “I wasn't interested naturally in finance, and accounting, it made it hard for me to see what my career would look like, not just at JP Morgan, but in this industry as a whole…”
  • “I did essentially talk myself out of that full time offer, no matter how big my performance was that summer, I was okay with that, because I was ready and willing to take a bet on myself to pursue my career in tech…”
  • “At that point, I had a very good feeling about what I want to pursue, because I knew from my experience at JPMorgan that I love contributing to the revenue of the company…”
  • “I really do appreciate you just trying something out or actually multiple roles out I wish more people would do that instead of putting themselves in a box…” – Kimmiko James.
  • “I recognize that I'm very blessed and lucky to be able to have a say, in what I want my career path to be. I think, I definitely move forward with that mindset…”
  • My experiences helped me understand what my future would look like, as far as a career, but understanding yourself I think is super important. I think there's also some preparation because I didn't necessarily take that leap, or didn't have no clue.
  • “I knew that this wasn't exactly what I wanted to do. I was familiar with what I wanted to do, and I was familiar with what I was capable of, or at least I was willing to take a bet on what I thought I was…”
  • Secondly, be prepared as much as you can, because I knew I had MLT, which connects students of color with Dell, Google, and Facebook. So, I knew I had connections to get me in front of recruiters, and tech companies.
  • I knew I like directly contributing to revenue, and I enjoyed connecting with clients. That more so directly tied to the sales function, and I knew I wanted to work in tech, hence, tech sales.
  • My transition to Dell started when I met one of my soon to be best friends. Her dad worked at Dell, and he found someone who was a part of the sales org recruiter, and she reached out to me with an interview. After my JP Morgan internship, after I finally decided that I'm going to take a bet on myself and ride this all the way out. I get an offer to interview for a final round again, and then I was offered to work with them.
  • I'll be working with Dell’s enterprise team, as an associate inside sales representative. I'll be helping with prospecting new clients, and pretty much helping the account manager, find new clients and secure any deals as in that role.
  • Some of the best advice I've been given, is to block off your calendar with breaks or lunch.
  • “I think it's important to give yourself that time to unwind, or not necessarily unwind, but just to kind of catch your breath in the middle of the day…”
  • “I'd also try to get your desk in a place that isn't in your bedroom. Just because you really want your bedroom to represent Zen fullness, you want to represent rest…”
  • “Create a routine that signals the beginning, but especially a routine that signals the end of your workday…”
  • “Since quarantine has happened, I've gotten a dog which definitely gets you out the house even more…”

Where to Find Jaimon Mcmillian

LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/jaimonmcmillian/

Instagram: d_artelle https://www.instagram.com/d_artelle/

Transcript

Note: Black Enterprise Network transcripts are generated using speech recognition software and human transcription. They may contain errors, although we do our best to avoid them. Please check the corresponding audio before quoting a transcript in print. Questions? Errors found in a transcript? Email us! 

Kimmiko James  0:00  
Honestly, when it comes to taking a risk and betting on yourself to try or pursue something different than what you're normally used to, it can be a difficult and scary experience. There's too many unknowns that can come out of it. But sometimes, and of course, depending on your situation, it might be what's best for you in the long run. In this episode, I'm joined by jayman mcmillian, an incoming associate inside sales rep at Dell Technologies and a fellow MLT. He shares his interest in the tech industry and how we got in from a non technical standpoint. And we talked about the idea of betting on yourself, and how it can potentially change your life for the better. Let's get into it. A small percentage of black people are currently represented in the tech industry and entrepreneurial spaces. This includes engineers, startup founders, investors, and especially those that hold leadership roles. I want to share their stories. And, again, just thanks for coming on. It's always a pleasure to like interview non technical people as well to just get your insight as to why you got into what you got into. And then I guess, maybe, I guess, in a way inspire other people that just assume tech is all engineering. So yeah, thanks for coming on.

Jaimon Mcmillian  1:10  
Thank you for having me. Kimmiko.

Kimmiko James  1:12  
So I just wanted to know, what influenced you to want to pursue business? Like, is it something you saw your family doing? You just wanted to do the same or what really piqued that interest for you?

Jaimon Mcmillian  1:24  
Definitely. So I would say I come from a family of like educators and techies and tinkerers. And so the men women are like in my family have fallen into those categories. And so they really push education. And so when it came to business, I realized, I think in high school, I would say that I had an interest and a knack for working with people and getting stuff done. So I don't know if you can attach the getting stuff done part to my type A personality or because I'm a Capricorn. But I realize I want to go to school for something that's tech related, but that is also tactful in helping get things and, Oh,

Kimmiko James  2:06  
I love that. It's always good to hear when people have a start in the beginning, in like middle school, high school versus like, College, where you kind of, you're not in a rush, per se with college, but you're kind of put on a timetable to get into something after you graduate. So that's how you got into it early. Yeah. But I just wanted to know why you chose your major over something like finance or economics, which is, you know, kind of the base level of majors you would see for non technical people in the industry.

Jaimon Mcmillian  2:36  
Definitely. So when I think about why I want to get into tech, you know, I was very intentional with trying to get into a technical program, but something that wasn't super technical. So it goes back to the high school again, you know, as I hear my dad tell stories about how he spent a lot of time with my great grandfather who was was a television repair man, in this small town called Lumberton North Carolina. And he was really good at what he did. And he was actually worked in the attic of the television repair shop. And he did that because the white man that he was working toward to them were his customers to see that a black male was working on their televisions, because black men just isn't smart enough to do that, you know. So, you know, so he's up in the attic, and my dad spent a lot of time with him. And my grandfather and my dad sat was also worked out in the telephone company. And then my dad is left in the locker room. So I kind of grew up around techies. And so what, when I went to college, it was between computer science, right information systems, and a woman Information Systems, because I liked how to brought together people tech in business to get things done. And I like that in comparison to finance and economics, which weren't necessarily related to tech. And we're also more in the weeds in the numbers and understanding the whys and how's of things? Oh,

Kimmiko James  4:09  
I wish my school had information systems, I probably would have taken that. Because I don't know what it is with me now. But I do prefer. I don't know how to word this, but kind of like you kind of touched upon. It's a mix of kind of being in tech, but not exactly. Like I do like touching the business and product aspects. I do like talking to people about how we can build something out. building it yourself is it's cool, but I don't like

Jaimon Mcmillian  4:36  
Right, right. Right. Is

Kimmiko James  4:37  
that how you kind of thought about CES? Were you just like, was it too difficult or maybe too technical or you just really enjoy the people business aspect way more.

Jaimon Mcmillian  4:47  
So it's a mixture of both. So you know, I think as a freshman coming into college and just seeing the requirements for CES I was like oh no, no about that. But then when I started looking at information systems. Just seeing that being housed in the business school and what the curriculum looked like. It just appealed to me more computer science seemed a bit more sciency theory base, whereas Information Systems was like, Alright, how can you take all this cool tech? Well, how can you take Visual Studio and gets up done? So a lot of our classes are about taking those different technical pieces, and applying them to business concepts.

Kimmiko James  5:29  
So did you end up taking some coding classes? Because Visual Studio, it sounds like you're familiar with it?

Jaimon Mcmillian  5:35  
Yes. So starting out freshman year, we take an HTML and CSS class, we do Visual Studio, everybody's a little bit different because we have some electives that we have to take. And so that could be some separate sequel, or working be like an advanced version of Visual Studio? or What else is there? Like? It's just so many different ways that you can go with it. But we did have to take some gardening classes.

Kimmiko James  6:01  
Yeah, thanks for sharing that. That's actually a very creative major, just touching both aspects of learning how to code and the non technical side, which we'll probably get into this later, about how technical skills really helps you on the business side of things. But I just think having a mix of both really helps. So

Jaimon Mcmillian  6:17  
Oh, definitely, for sure.

Kimmiko James  6:19  
So when it comes to growing your career in your network in tech, I believe that community plays a very important role, especially if you're a black student, you know, there's not always support laid out for you. So you have to find those specific communities. So I wanted to know, how did you go about finding communities on or off your campus, for example, MLT, I saw you're a part of Alpha Kappa Psi. hope I pronounced that right. And any other organizations that might have helped you?

Jaimon Mcmillian  6:43  
Alright, so for me, my freshman year, I knew I wanted to get an internship in the tech space, I had no clue what that even meant for me what roles I was exactly going for. I just knew I wanted to start getting that internship and industry experience early. And so I remember in trying to look for an internship, I said, Hey, I'm going to make my LinkedIn, my Twitter. So at the time, I was waking up and getting on Twitter. And so I said, How can I make my LinkedIn a place where I want to be? Why wake up and go straight to it. And so I started reaching out to people who may not have been a part of my school's community, but we're just a part of the tech community or this student, assuming we had my major or some people down at in Catlin, which is right down the road from my school. And so, you know, through those connections, I was able to be informed about these other smaller communities with ns hack or even communities that could open up doors down the road to help me get into tech. And so MLT was one of them, which I saw like a flyer for my Legion TL. And I saw that was for sophomores, I was a freshman at the time. So I was like, Okay, I'll come back to this later. But one of the guys I reached out to marquees were at the time, he was an explorer intern at Microsoft. And he later go on to work with Nike, and then back to myself and when I but I met him and I was talking with him and just getting any insight about his internship experience and how I got to Microsoft. And through that conversation, he then again mentioned MLT. And so that's what kind of kept MLT on my radar.

Kimmiko James  8:35  
Oh, that's, that's something I don't hear a lot like freshman just knowing what an internship is. And then getting on LinkedIn, and then networking. So I'm gonna just call them skills, because I believe that's what they are. It's nothing that comes naturally. But those kinds of job search skills, people don't find out about them, at least until their junior year. It's kind of crazy to me, like, especially for me, too. I didn't find out about, you know, setting up my LinkedIn or going to networking events until way later, and which I was like, Oh, my God, why didn't anybody tell me freshman year? Because those freshmen sophomore programs, they are very beneficial to you some surprising to hear. Yeah,

Jaimon Mcmillian  9:13  
yeah. And what's really cool is in my business school, we have to take these professional development courses, everybody has to take it. And so there's one for your freshman year, your sophomore year, junior senior year, in the freshman year class, when I was taking it was about resume writing, networking, interviewing. So they introduced us to these topics really, really early, which I thought was really cool. Because prior to college, my resume was trash, basically non existent in a way. That's how bad it was after taking that class. It really sparked my interest for professional development. And that's what really set me on on that path.

Kimmiko James  9:54  
That's good to hear, like what set me on the path was MLT because before it was kind of some light net Working, just people that are in the CS community like, Oh, you've interned at Yelp and Google, obviously, let me talk to you. But I didn't know how to really research that stuff on my own. I didn't know how to pitch myself to Well, my resume was crap. And then I found out about MLT. And they really just hooked me up with all that stuff. So if you're, I mean, I'm not being paid. But if you're a sophomore, or junior, graduating a little later, then check out MLT.

Jaimon Mcmillian  10:26  
Definitely, for sure. life changing experience.

Kimmiko James  10:29  
Yeah. See, I just want to like jump into your industry experience. So this is me coming from a technical role, not knowing how all these analysts roles are. So. So yeah, you worked at JPMorgan Chase and CO, both as a middle market banking summer analyst, and then a syndicated finance summer analyst. So what did you do and both of these roles and feel free to take your time? So?

Jaimon Mcmillian  10:54  
Yeah, right. Right. Right. Yeah. Because I learned very quickly, that financial banking is a world on its own, I, my background, or at least my family background, I didn't know anybody in my family who worked at a bank and my interactions with the bank, were with you going into the teller and you've given them money to deposit or whatever the case may be. So my experience with JP Morgan, really opened up my eyes to a whole new world. So the middle market bank sits within JP Morgan's commercial bank, and the minimarket Bank, their job, their purpose is to help clients within the revenue brackets of 20 million to $500 million a year, grow their business grow, maintain their business. And so as a summer analysts in the middle market space, I sat in the Charlotte office and the Charlotte office held all the analysts for the southeast region of the United States. And so also, as an analyst, we supported the three teams that helped the minimarket Bank carry out that goal of serving their clients. So the three teams are credit, banking, and Treasury. And so credit, those are the number crunchers that seem they they try to create capital structures that are beneficial to help the clients do what they need to do, but also not detrimental to the bank and not paying the bank in any kind of risky situation with money. Then you have Treasury, Treasury, folks of the cash management people. So if a company wants to open up a location of their business in China, then you're going to need the Treasury folks to tap into foreign exchange to help you understand how the currency differences can help your business or impact your business. Let's say a company wants to give their employees a credit card and a company card to go and why design clients or to use during business trips. That's also Treasury. Then the third group is banking. And the bankers are like the quarterbacks of these deals, they act as the main point of contact for the clients. And they essentially pull in anybody they need to help service the client. So if a client came to a banker, and was like, Hey, you know, we want to open up this new branch in China, and we want to give our employees cards to be able to expense their trips to China for business dealings, then the bankers like okay, let me go and talk to the people and Treasury will some of those people into the deal. And then they will both go and talk to credit and say, Hey, this is what this company wants to do. And the credit team will evaluate the company's credit score, if you will, and figure out like what's gonna work best for both of us. So as an analyst Finally, directly answer your question. And analysts, we are tasked to help any of those three teams, it could be from creating a pitch book for a client, it could be running a model for the credit team. Honestly, anything physically putting together the pitch books could be something, just anything. And that was really great because I got to dive into this whole new world I never really got to see before. But I also got a good vibe breadth of different types of businesses, because I sat on the core team, which dealt with companies in the beverage industry and the tech industry and the agricultural industry. And in the middle market space. It's so the companies are really unique, like you never knew that there's a company making $160 million a year by making the little bolts that go into the bed that you got from IKEA. That's the whole company. And so that was really, really interesting. A great first experience in business and banking. And then second summer, I was a part of the syndicator finance team. So this team was different from this last team because this team was a product group. And so we didn't just serve one specific part of the country, We service the entire country, any banker from New York to California to Texas, can come to us and say, Hey, we need your assistance. And so they will come to the syndicated finance team. And in particular, when a company was like, for instance, hey, we want a $100 million dollar loan to open up a new facility in Thailand. And so we would look at that. And you know, maybe we feel like our balance sheet Committee, which is how judges deals whether or not we should get into the they will decide, okay, yeah, maybe JPMorgan doesn't want to hold the entire 100 million on our balance sheet, that's a bit too risky for us. So let's divvy it up amongst three other banks now that all four of us can come together, to divvy up this $100 million loan. So our group within reach out, so Wells Fargo, the evey, PNC arena, Hey, would you guys be interested, and in holding a portion of this long, so at a very high level overview, that's what that team did. And so as an analyst, it's kind of the same vibe, you know, you, you know, you might be putting together a pitch book, or you might be doing an industry, our comp is what they call the end, this is where you pretty much show clients how their deal compares to the recipe industry or other players in the industry and that kind of stuff. So pretty much the same vibe, you're an analyst, you gain all the different, these different experiences. And what was really great about that group is deal flow was up. And because you service the entire country, it was kind of easy to be a part of that group, especially as an intern was, is really awesome. And something that a lot of people wanted, like there was maybe six or seven of us that was selected out of 300 to be a part of this team. So it was definitely a good look and a great experience.

Kimmiko James  17:18  
Yeah, thanks for sharing that. I mean, I wish these banks would like post this kind of stuff on their job websites. Because especially, you know, I mean, sorry, for any bank, people that are listening, I don't care. That part out, but just they're not. They're not very attractive companies in tech, you know, like JP Morgan, Capital One is PwC. A bank, I don't think they're bank, Bank of America, just these kinds of companies aren't attractive to people. But when you break down your experience, especially the first summer that sounds very entrepreneurial, and very interesting to learn about different companies, and the different, I guess, areas they're in, because when I think of working at a bank, I'm just like, I'm just working on internal things to help JP Morgan. That's it.

Jaimon Mcmillian  18:09  
Summary. Right? Yeah. And he does it very well does seem like that, from the outside. And I didn't realize that until I actually got into it. And I think because it's so nuanced, and it's so complex that, you know, I mean, kudos to the people that try to find some way to write that job description. But the job description itself includes like some pretty convoluted words and concepts that I think dilute the excitement, the experience that that role can provide. And so I've gotten pretty good at trying to explain this as I'm now coming back to school and coming back to my family and and trying to explain to them what exactly I do have definitely, it's taken some time, but I've definitely done we've accommodated.

Kimmiko James  19:02  
Yeah, I mean, anybody that's worked at Tech, or generally, these kinds of companies, it's hard to explain to family. I've been there. So you're not you're not alone. But I just wanted to know, why did you decide not to pursue either of these roles for a full time job?

Jaimon Mcmillian  19:18  
Definitely. So what? So first, you know, I'll preface this by saying I am an Information Systems Management major. So, you know, while I'm in the business school, we touched finance and accounting a little bit, but that's not necessarily my personal interest. And it wasn't my major side. I don't spend most of my time in school, studying it and so I knew this even going into my first internship experience with them, but I think it was exciting because of what what kind of experience I could have gotten from it. I think that's what really excited me at the time, even though getting still I still wanted to work in tech. So I realized, after my first internship with JPMorgan that I loved JP Morgan, I it was, it was a great company culture was great. It was a big bank prestigious, you know, opportunity to grow and travel. I really liked that aspect. And I liked what I did. But going back to the whole finance and accounting thing, I wasn't naturally passionate or interested in it. I think what interested me in finance was the fact that there was so much that I did not know. That's what interested me not necessarily because oh my gosh, I hear private equity and write up. And so with that being said, You know, I kind of knew when it came time for full time that I wanted to pursue my career in tech, for sure. Even if I got the offer or not, I wanted to at least try to pursue it. So I kind of have this coming to Jesus moment with my manager halfway through my second summer. And, you know, I finally everything, I just vocalize I kind of had that realization and having that meeting with my managers, I essentially, talk myself out of the full time offer, which will my parents and mentors heard, when I explained to them like what happened, they were like, you did what this during the pandemic, yeah, internships are being cut full time job placement was doing. So for me to, you know, have this coming to Jesus moment, which was actually quite exposing to my managers, it was like you did what you don't leave a good company. And, you know, we're playing chess, not checkers here. And so it was like a really big thing. But, you know, I think for me, it was bigger than all of that. I think it was me finally deciding. I think I knew deep down inside that and having this conversation, I was deciding to take a bet on myself, and to pursue something that I not only thought I'd be good at, but something that I thought I'd be really, really interested in. Because I noticed too at JPMorgan, because I wasn't actually interested in it, that I had to work three and four times as hard to be the very best banking handle the switch is what I want to be, I want to be the best of what I'm doing. That's the bar. And so also, because I wasn't interested naturally in finance, and accounting, it made it hard for me to see what my career would look like, not just at JP Morgan, but in this industry as a whole. And so I'm having all the all of these, these Aha, coming to Jesus moment, if you will, are happening as I'm telling, and having this conversation with my managers. And so like I said, I did essentially talk myself out of that, that full time offer, no matter how big my performance was that summer, I was okay with that, because I was ready and willing to take a bet on myself to pursue my career in tech. And at that point, I had a very good feeling about what i what i want to pursue, because I knew from my experience at JPMorgan that I love contributing to the revenue of the company. I love connecting with clients to help solve problems with our solutions. And so that directly related to sales and are a newbie industry. And so that's what led me

Kimmiko James  23:40  
Hey, guys, Pardon the Interruption, but I just wanted to take a minute to talk about the new black enterprise network podcast website. If you've ever been curious about what a guest looks like, or what their social media links are, then we have detailed guest profiles for each episode. And there's also detailed show notes with time markers in case you want to find a specific point or piece of advice without listening to the entire episode. There's also readable episode transcriptions. And also the website allows you to easily send questions and feedback. If you want to get in contact with me, just know that the website will be updated on a weekly basis. So if you don't see something done already, then it will be done soon. Check it out at Black enterprise network.fm. I just want to start by saying I really appreciate you having that kind of mindset of Well, part one. I really do appreciate you just trying something out or actually multiple roles out I wish more people would do that instead of putting themselves in a box of for example, doing the same kind of internship every single summer and then you do that full time and it's just like you're already stuck in and you might not even like it so firstly, definitely appreciate that. But I really just appreciate you just sticking with you to stay with your guns to be honest. It can't be easy to just You know how so many people, mentors, family, even JP Morgan themselves tell you like, why would you turn this down, especially with everything going on. And a lot of the people I've interviewed, they've kind of gone through the same thing of, you know, they, they have this really good job, right. But they they're not passionate about no matter how good it pays and right to hear it be kind of shut down by other people, it can be kind of hard. But to just get past and do what you want to do. That's, it's a wonderful mindset to have no matter how difficult it is. So

Jaimon Mcmillian  25:32  
yeah, and I think I had to also check my pupilage at the door, because I also realize that a lot of people in this world don't get to have jobs that they're passionate about that excite them, like your job is solely to put food on the table. And so I recognize that I'm very blessed and lucky to be able to have a say, in what I want my career path to be. And and I think I definitely move forward with that mindset.

Kimmiko James  26:03  
Yeah, I mean, taking a bet on yourself is by no means easy. Especially going into the pandemic, where a lot of people our age, is it because I took a year off. So I was definitely supposed to graduate. But we'll just say, new grads, we know, at least the ones I know are definitely struggling in this job market. So I commend you here taking taking a bet on yourself. But this is kind of like a follow up, I thought of to just go along with that of how do you this isn't to make it sound rude or anything. But how do you block the noise, you know, of people just constantly in your ear just telling you to do something, you know, you really don't want to do and just sticking with your guns and your what you want to do?

Jaimon Mcmillian  26:47  
I think so. The is understanding yourself, understanding. You know, like I said, in the beginning, I knew I wanted to be in tech, but I had no clue what that looked like. And that journey for me up onwards to be a data analyst. At one point, I thought I want to do like something with data analytics, but more on the marketing side, then I thought I The last thing before my whole JP Morgan side quest, I thought was to be a product manager. And then so I kind of moved back on those experiences and think, Okay, why did I like those experiences, and those helped me understand what my future looked like, as far as a career. But understanding yourself I think is super important. And then I think there's also some preparation because I didn't necessarily take that leap, and didn't have no clue what, what was next. You know, I knew I had MLT there. And so I would say knowing yourself is super important. Because I think for me, it was easier for me to drown out the noise because I was taking a bet on not just like, I don't want to do this. So let me just take a bet on myself. You know, I knew that this wasn't exactly what I wanted to do. I was familiar with what I wanted to do. And I smiliar with what I was capable of, or at least I was willing to take a bet on what I thought I was. So I would say that's one part and I people's second part, I think is being prepared as much as you can. Because I knew I had MLT which connects students of color with, you know, Dell, and Google and Facebook and ensuing themselves or so I knew I had connections to get me in front of recruiters, ad tech company. And I had people within my own network that I felt could be influential in helping me make this big move. So I think between knowing myself, and knowing who and how I could get into tech, I think was was really important. And I think it was actually hard. I don't think I could have made that call, freshman or sophomore year. And in fact, even after my first internship with JP Morgan, I came back to JPMorgan in a story that, you know, looking back on it, I think, reflects me not taking a bet on myself then. And I think, in the tech, especially the non technical space of things. You're fighting over smaller spots. You know, my friend at Microsoft, because she was a marketing intern at Microsoft, there was 30 marketing interns for the entire company. And there are like 1000 2000 software engineering answers so, you know, that is even more risky. Because we're fighting over these smaller spaces within the tech industry, because our roles aren't technically essential to the business, like, you know, if we're creating software, Microsoft creates Microsoft Teams and writes a bunch of other things. But if you're a software company, you need software engineers, like that's your bread and butter, everything else helps you along the way. But your demands for your bread and butter. So yeah, that all that to say, Know yourself, and also, you know, have a little bit of preparation behind the bed you're thinking,

Kimmiko James  30:38  
Hmm, I mean, it's probably a follow up episode with you eventually in the future, but I was essentially going to ask like, do you feel like you made enough impact in your non technical role? But I think that'll, time will tell. Since you haven't really gotten into that, aside from being Morgan. So yeah, we'll see. Follow follow up. So, regarding you joining Dell, starting full time, as an associate inside sales rep at Dell, very soon, congratulations, by the way, how did this transition happen? Because it seems to be like a very, you know, comparing of interests from being an analyst in the finance, space to business and then to now cells. So how did that transition kind of happen?

Jaimon Mcmillian  31:25  
So the transition for me happened before I even, you know, started interviewing, like I said, Before, I knew I like directly contributing to revenue, I enjoyed connecting with clients. And so that more so directly tied to the sales function. And we knew I wanted to work in tech. So boom, tech sales. So how Dell, so for me, my transition to Dell started when I met one of my soon to be best friends. So her dad worked at Dell, and we would go home to our family farm. every other weekend or so it's our dad really, you know, really knew who we were as people that he knew about our internships, our skills, who we are as people, and he was, he would take these moments from time to time to try to put us on to doubt like, oh, gosh, Dell, you know, we are really great company, we have great benefits, blah, blah, blah. And so, you know, at the time, you know, none of our friends really took him up on that offer. It's just kind of like, Okay, cool. And then I went on this whole side quest with JP Morgan. And so, along the way, as I'm having these these coming to Jesus moments, I realized I wanted to pursue tech sales. And so I reached out to my friend's dad, hey, gee, you know, I'm really interested in tech sells, I love the space that Dell plays in, as far as you know, helping clients with their workplace transformation, cloud, and all that kind of stuff. And so, I expressed interest and he was like, great, we'd love to have you a part of the team. And he found someone who was a part of the sales org recruiter, and she reached out to me with an interview, I was like, wow, like that the power of networking is pretty quick, too. And I interviewed and this is like, not early in a pandemic. But it was maybe a little bit before I started my internship with JPMorgan. And I end up during the first interview, and like, Okay, well, I'm fine around a little bit later, because I'm not really sure if they're gonna fly people out or what that is gonna look like. And so then, after my JP Morgan internship, after I finally decided I'm going to take about myself and ride this all the way out. I get an offer to interview for a final round again, I offered to work with them.

Kimmiko James  34:04  
Beautiful, beautiful into the story. Well, I mean, it's not ending.

But again, kind of too early to tell, but do you know what kind of work you'd be doing in terms of sales because I have no idea what sales people do, but I haven't met sales interns, my bad for not talking to them enough.

Jaimon Mcmillian  34:27  
That's okay, like you're getting your your knowledge here. So I'll be working with Dells enterprise team, as an associate inside sales representative. And so as an associate inside sales representative, I'll be going to training for a good portion of that role. But I'll be helping with prospecting new clients, and pretty much helping the account manager, find new clients and secure any deals as in that role. And so the products I'll be selling will be larger enterprises. products in there more into it. So it's not kind of like one specific thing. It's more of an entire package from the Data Warehouse Solutions, referrals, that kind of thing. So the whole?

Kimmiko James  35:13  
Yeah, like I said too, early to tell, but it sounds like you know, you're getting into so I'm excited to share sharing. So Oh, yeah, we kind of touched upon this in the beginning. But this is something I would like to get into anyway. So as we kind of both agreed, we both believe that it's like, I feel like it is important to have some kind of net technical knowledge, especially if you're doing a non technical role, because it makes it easier to talk to like engineers, product managers, etc. So what kind of coding courses have you taken? or any kind of technical classes that you found to be very helpful in your industry? For any industry?

Jaimon Mcmillian  35:51  
Hmm, definitely. So I think I would have to say, I've really enjoyed my visual car class, I'm not sure if it directly helped me with my role. Like maybe if I took like some kind of beating course, or maybe like a computer engineering class, that might have been really helpful for what I'm about to get into, by building my Visual Studio class, just because it was fun. I think it was really cool seeing how we could take, you know, this language, and we ended up creating a whole like pizza ordering screen as our final project. And, and that was a lot of fun. And really, really cool.

Kimmiko James  36:38  
Cool, cool, dope. And then last question, which I believe would be helpful to people. And I don't think it's talked about enough. And just tips for on how to better productively work from home, especially as a student, because I feel like working from home has just been generalized for people that have already been in the industry for years. So they're kind of used to the workflow, the company may have a set schedule with their families. I don't think we have that yet. So let's kind of get into that. So I really liked your article on how to create a desk setup for students working from home, which I'll link on the website as well. So don't worry to look for that if you're listening. So would you have any other advice you'd want to share on how you'd manage working from home? It could be stress management, self care, which I think also isn't talked about enough setting boundaries by having a quality desk setup and maybe a different part of your house or? Yeah,

Jaimon Mcmillian  37:34  
yeah, definitely. So you actually touched on some of the things but some of the best advice I've been given, is to block off your calendar with breaks or lunch, so that we've been by has a plan a meeting with you, you are like they won't use that time because it's completely blocked off. And I think it's important to give yourself that time to unwind, or not necessarily online, but just to kind of catch your breath in the middle of the day. That's important. I'd also try to get your desk in a place that isn't in your bedroom. Just because you really want your bedroom to represent Zin fullness, you want to represent rest. And so for me, my desk is currently sitting in my bedroom, due to lack of space in my apartment at school. But moving forward, when I started working full time, I definitely want to dedicate an entire room for work, because I think he'll simulate that work atmosphere like okay, I'm going into this room, this is work, work. And then the last thing I'll say is create a routine that signals the beginning, but especially a routine that signals the end of your workday. So whether that be alright, I'm done. Let me go on a walk, you know, and then walk around the block. And come back. I think that'd be really important. Just kind of unwinding for sure. And and also just getting out the house because you're you're always in the home.

Kimmiko James  39:05  
I know I am. It's not like I like it. Yeah, but a quick follow up I would have for that before we kind of end this would just be how do you maintain that level of Zen and balance because I feel like the majority of us, especially at the student level and new grad level are working from our bedrooms. We don't always have the space yet or the full time job. Do that. So how have you maintained that balance?

Jaimon Mcmillian  39:35  
Definitely. So I you know, since quarante has happened I've gotten a dog which definitely gets you out the house even more. His name is Coby Beagle mix, like I'm from the animal shelter. So shout out to Coby recipes Coby, but in a positive, I'm so like, trying to juggle that, too. Like I find myself checking emails. You know,

we're extracurriculars, or you know, a professor, whatever the case may be, you know, even late at night, but I think I really want to get on, you know, just having these cutoff points where it's like, okay, you know, nothing was really good. And I usually do Fridays. I'm pretty good at like having my Alright, it's five or six o'clock. All my homework for the weekend, you know, I'm done.

Kimmiko James  40:25  
Okay, good. I mean, everybody has their different ways. So thanks for sharing yours. And the last question I have is where can people follow you in your journey? I believe you post on LinkedIn from time to time but do you have any social media you want to share or anything else?

Jaimon Mcmillian  40:40  
You can find me on LinkedIn, Jamie McMillan, you can follow me on where I post my travel adventures and you'll see cobis from time to time and you can follow me at D underscore ARCELED underscore

Unknown Speaker  41:03  
consider

Kimmiko James  41:05  
j mins links will be linked on the website within the coming weeks. So thanks for coming on. Really appreciate you just sharing your story. Lots of helpful advice that people will enjoy I'm sure and yeah, just thanks in general.

Jaimon Mcmillian  41:17  
Maybe you can

Kimmiko James  41:19  
join me in the next episode in which I'll be joined by Jason brisco, the software engineer at Survey Monkey. Thank you again for listening to this episode of The Black enterprise network podcast. It would be greatly appreciated if you could leave a review on Apple podcast or any platform that has reviews